Modeling 9-Year Survival Of Oak Advance Regeneration Under Shelterwood Overstories

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  • Authors: Spetich, Martin A.; Graney, David L.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS¨C71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 238-242

Abstract

Abstract Survival of white oak (Quercus alba L.), northern red oak (Q. rubra L.), and black oak (Q. velutina Lam.) on upland oak stands was modeled 9 years after shelterwood treatment. Stands represented a range of site quality, overstory stocking, and understory treatments. There were three levels of understory treatment and two levels of shelterwood treatment for a total of six overstory-understory treatment combinations. Understory treatment consisted of (1) removal of all competing woody stems < 1.6 inches diameter at breast height, (2) removal of this diameter range of stems but only those that were ¡Ý5 feet tall, and (3) no understory treatment. Overstory shelterwood treatments were 40 and 60 percent residual stocking. We used logistic regression to model survival of advance regeneration 9 years after understory and overstory treatments. Results were expressed as survival probabilities. Significant predictors of survival included initial seedling basal diameter, percent residual stocking of the shelterwood treatment, site index, and the number of terminal bud scale scars of the seedling prior to treatment.

  • Citation: Spetich, Martin A.; Graney, David L. 2004. Modeling 9-Year Survival Of Oak Advance Regeneration Under Shelterwood Overstories. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS¨C71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 238-242
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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