Baseline Overstory Conditions in Four Watersheds of Varying Management Intensity in the Eastern Ouachita Mountains

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  • Authors: Guldin, James M.; Foti, Thomas
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 189-197

Abstract

Abstract - Baseline tree data were collected in four watersheds in the eastern Ouachita Mountains during 1996-98. By watershed, average basal area ranged from 71 to 102 square feet per acre, average tree density ranged from 234 to 295 trees per acre, and quadratic mean diameter of trees ranged from 7.41 to 8.22 inches. Variables for which the largest values were associated with the unmanaged South Alum Creek watershed and the smallest values were associated with the most intensively managed Little Glazypeau Creek watershed include basal area for all trees, stem density for all trees, basal area and stem density of the white oak-southern red oak species group and for all hardwoods, and basal area and stem density of shortleaf pine and for all conifers. Conversely, variables for which the largest values were associated with the Little Glazypeau watershed, and the lowest values were associated with the South Alum Creek watershed, were loblolly pine basal area and stem density. The data suggest that it may be possible to relate management intensity to descriptive mensurational variables at the landscape scale in the eastern Ouachita Mountains.

  • Citation: Guldin, James M.; Foti, Thomas 2004. Baseline Overstory Conditions in Four Watersheds of Varying Management Intensity in the Eastern Ouachita Mountains. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 189-197
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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