Age Distribution of Oak Forests in North-Central Arkansas

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  • Authors: Soucy, Rick; Heitzman, Eric; Spetich, Martin A.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 53-56

Abstract

We used tree ring analysis to reconstruct the tree establishment patterns in four mature white oak (Quercus alba L.)-northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.)-hickory (Carya spp.) forests in the Ozark Mountains of north-central Arkasas. Cross sections were removed from the stumps of 321 recently harvested trees and total age determined for each. All four stands originated between 1900 and the 1920s following a stand-level disturbance(s) such as timber harvesting and/ or wildfire. Oak establishment was abundant for 10-30 yrs following the disturbance(s) but steadily declined thereafter. There was no oak establishment at the study sites over the past 50-60 yrs. Establishment since the 1940s and 1950s was dominated by shade tolerant species such as flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)

  • Citation: Soucy, Rick; Heitzman, Eric; Spetich, Martin A. 2004. Age Distribution of Oak Forests in North-Central Arkansas. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 53-56
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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