Use of glufosinate to control natural pines—a possible replacement for glyphosate

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  • Authors: Ezell, Andrew W.; Self, Andrew B.; Ezell, John E.
  • Publication Year: 2022
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In: Willis, John L.; Self, Andrew B.; Siegert, Courtney M., eds. Proceedings of the 21st Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-268. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: pp.. 59–61.

Abstract

Recent concerns over the use of glyphosate have prompted land managers to seek a replacement for that herbicide. Two treatments containing glufosinate (Finale VU) were compared to one treatment without glufosinate and an untreated check. The primary focus was the control of naturally occurring loblolly pine. All treatments were replicated three times in a completely randomized design. After 8 months, all herbicide treatments demonstrated excellent control of loblolly pine. Based on this pilot study, glufosinate appears to have good potential for control of loblolly pines.

  • Citation: Ezell, Andrew W.; Self, Andrew B.; Ezell, John E. 2022. Use of glufosinate to control natural pines—a possible replacement for glyphosate. In: Willis, John L.; Self, Andrew B.; Siegert, Courtney M., eds. Proceedings of the 21st Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-268. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 59–61.
  • Posted Date: September 23, 2022
  • Modified Date: September 28, 2022
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