Can longleaf pine plantations be modeled by calibrating mixed-effects models of other species?

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  • Authors: VanderSchaaf, Curtis L.
  • Publication Year: 2022
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In: Willis, John L.; Self, Andrew B.; Siegert, Courtney M., eds. Proceedings of the 21st Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-268. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: pp.115–122.

Abstract

A growth-and-yield model system applicable for the relatively greater growth rates of more recently planted longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) is needed. The present analysis uses mixed-effects models of other pines fit using measurements across a more complete range of stand development stages to predict the future development of contemporary longleaf pine plantations. This approach could be useful when there are insufficient measurement ages across a rotation for newer silvicultural treatments. Testing data were obtained of container-planted longleaf pine in central Louisiana. Mixed-effects models both published and newly fit were used for testing purposes. Calibration ages of 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 were helpful in “molding” trajectories of other species to the characteristics of these longleaf plots at age 20. However, to obtain accurate predictions at ages beyond 20 may require calibration measurements of longleaf pine at older, but still mid-rotation ages. It appears that there are likely “optimum” ages to conduct an inventory such that models of other species can be calibrated to produce accurate predictions at ages 25, 30, 35, etc.

  • Citation: VanderSchaaf, Curtis L. 2022. Can longleaf pine plantations be modeled by calibrating mixed-effects models of other species? In: Willis, John L.; Self, Andrew B.; Siegert, Courtney M., eds. Proceedings of the 21st Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-268. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 115–122.
  • Posted Date: September 23, 2022
  • Modified Date: September 28, 2022
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