Success of Underplanting Northern Red Oaks

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  • Authors: Spetich, Martin A.; Dey, Daniel C.; Johnson, Paul S.; Graney, David L.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 206-211

Abstract

We summarize results of the growth and survival of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings 11 years after planting in shelterwoods in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas. Shelterwood overstories were harvested 3 years after underplanting > 4,000 northern red oak seedlings. Woody vegetation that was competing with planted seedlings received two, one, or no competition control treatment(s). Results are expressed as the probability that a planted tree will live to attain a favorable competitive position at a specified year. These probabilities depend on initial seedling stem caliper before planting, site quality, weed control intensity, and shelterwood percent stocking. These probabilities of success increase with decreasing shelterwood stocking, decreasing site quality, increasing initial stem caliper, and increasing intensity of weed control. The reciprocals of the dominance probabilities provide silviculturally useful estimates of the numbers of trees that would need to be planted to obtain, on the average, one competitively successful tree in the future. Based on these results, we provide practical management methods to optimize success of underplanted northern red oak seedlings and to reach future stocking goals.

  • Citation: Spetich, Martin A.; Dey, Daniel C.; Johnson, Paul S.; Graney, David L. 2004. Success of Underplanting Northern Red Oaks. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 206-211
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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