Crown Health of Reserve Hardwood Trees Following Reproduction Cutting in the Ouachita Mountains

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Starkey, Dale A.; Guldin, James M.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 92-97

Abstract

Abstract - Monitoring the health of reserve hardwood trees is being performed as part of the Ecosystem Management Research Project on the Ouachita and Ozark National Forests in Arkansas. A suite of crown variables (diameter, live crown ratio, density, dieback, and foliage transparency) was used to detect significant changes in reserve tree health over time. While treatments had some effect on crown variables over time, seasonal climatic conditions (e.g. acute drought) may have had a greater effect. It was generally apparent that for the most intensive treatments, crown variables worsened more over time compared to less intensive treatments. Results will provide information about the success of retaining such trees and provide guidelines for selecting reserve trees in future operational harvests.

  • Citation: Starkey, Dale A.; Guldin, James M. 2004. Crown Health of Reserve Hardwood Trees Following Reproduction Cutting in the Ouachita Mountains. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 92-97
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.