Survival and Growth of Bottomland Hardwood Seedlings and Natural Woody Invaders Near Forest Edges

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: McCoy, John W.; Keeland, Bobby D.; Wharton, Kristi
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 535-541

Abstract

Several oak species are frequently planted for reforestation projects in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV), but the success of these plantings has been variable. The survival and growth of planted seed or seedlings are affected by a variety of factors, including competition, herbivory, site preparation, precipitation, planting stock quality, and planting techniques. We surveyed reforested fields in the LMAV to examine survival and growth of planted oaks and the occurrence of natural invaders that became established in these fields. Oak (Quercus spp.) densities averaged 413 stems per ha within 150 m of forest edges, as compared with 484 stems per ha between 150 to 300 m from the forest edge. Also there were higher densities of natural woody invaders near forest edges (4,234 stems per ha at 0 - 150 m compared with 2,193 stems per ha at 150-300 m). These data show that seed and seedlings proximity to a nearby forest edge has an effect on survival and growth. Since planted trees in the 0 – 150 m forest edge zone encounter high densities of natural invaders, it may be prudent to reduce the number of planted trees. Naturally occurring invaders enhance diversity and also augment depleted oak plantings near the forest edge with no added expense or effort.

  • Citation: McCoy, John W.; Keeland, Bobby D.; Wharton, Kristi 2004. Survival and Growth of Bottomland Hardwood Seedlings and Natural Woody Invaders Near Forest Edges. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 535-541
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.