Growth and Development of Outplanted High-Quality Northern Red Oak Seedlings and the Effects of Competing Herbaceous Productions Within Four Overstory Treatments -- First-Year Results

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  • Authors: Oswalt, Christopher M.; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Scharbaum, Scott E.; Houston, Allan E.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 559-564

Abstract

Historically, oak (Quercus spp .) regeneration success on highly productive hardwood sites can be described as highly variable. Research has shown that establishing large advance oak regeneration prior to overstory removal is neces-sary to maintain oak populations in future stands. However, experience indicates that forest landowners are typically unwilling to wait the necessary time to develop natural advance oak reproduction, instead allowing markets to dictate harvest times. This fact necessitates the use of artificial oak regeneration to maintain oak as an important component of future stands. To date, the success of artificial oak regeneration has also been highly variable. To develop an improved understanding and enhanced methods of artificial oak regeneration, we examined the growth of outplanted, high-quality, locally adapted, 1-0 northern red oak (Q. rubra L.) seedlings and the effects of competing herbaceous vegetation after four overstory treatments (no cut, high grade, commercial clearcut, two age) at the Ames Plantation in west Tennessee. Sixty seedlings from 2 genetic families were outplanted within each of twelve 2-acre treatment units,resulting in 3 replicates of the 4 treatments. Initial height, root collar diameter, and number of first-order lateral roots were recorded for each seedling. Outplantings were monitored monthly during the growing season. This paper compares the first year seedling growth patterns (height and root collar diameter growth) and the impacts of competing herbaceous vegetation with emphasis on an exotic, Asian annual C4 grass. The silvicultural implications of seedling development over the four treatment areas are evaluated.

  • Citation: Oswalt, Christopher M.; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Scharbaum, Scott E.; Houston, Allan E. 2004. Growth and Development of Outplanted High-Quality Northern Red Oak Seedlings and the Effects of Competing Herbaceous Productions Within Four Overstory Treatments -- First-Year Results. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 559-564
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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