Outplanting of the Endangered Pondberry

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  • Authors: Devall, Margaret S.; Schiff, Nathan M.; Skojac, Stephanie A.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 574-577

Abstract

Pondberry [Lindera melissifolia (Walt) Blume, Lauraceae] is an endangered shrub that occurs in seasonally flooded wetlands in the Southeastern United States. We established new pondberry populations as an aid in conserving the species, whose distribution and abundance have been affected by habitat destruction and alteration. We dug equal numbers of young male and female pondberry stems from a natural population, planted them in pots, and translocated them to five protected locations in the field. After 1 year, 69 percent of the plants survived, with male and female plants surviving equally well. More than 90 percent of the surviving plants had stems that increased in height, although the height of the tallest stems decreased. Many of the plants produced new stems, but some older stems died during the year. Most of the present pondberry habitat is surrounded by agricultural fields, which significantly limits dispersal. This study shows that pondberry can be successfully outplanted, in efforts to assure survival of the species.

  • Citation: Devall, Margaret S.; Schiff, Nathan M.; Skojac, Stephanie A. 2004. Outplanting of the Endangered Pondberry. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 574-577
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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