Distribution of Mature Cones, Conelets, and Old Cones in Shortleaf Pine-Oak Stands an Uneven-Aged Regeneration Cut

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  • Authors: Grayson, Kenneth J.; Wittwer, Robert F.; Shelton, Michael G.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 478-482

Abstract

Sixteen shortleaf pine trees were felled in a stand 10 years after an uneven-aged regeneration cut reduced pine basal area to 60 square feet per acre and hardwoods were controlled. Sixteen unreleased trees in an adjacent uncut pine-hardwood stand (120 square feet per acre) were felled for comparison. Sample trees were selected from four 2-inch d.b.h. classes (11, 13, 15, and 17 inch) and tree crowns were divided into four positions (upper south, upper north, lower south, and lower north). The 15 and 17-inch released trees produced significantly more mature cones than unreleased trees in the same classes (by four times) and released trees in smaller classes (by four times). Cone production for unreleased trees did not differ among diameter classes. Cone production by crown position ranked: lower north = lower south < upper north < upper south. The lower north position produced significantly fewer conelets than other positions. Released trees retained more older cones than unreleased trees, and older cones were significantly correlated with both mature cones and conelets.

  • Citation: Grayson, Kenneth J.; Wittwer, Robert F.; Shelton, Michael G. 2004. Distribution of Mature Cones, Conelets, and Old Cones in Shortleaf Pine-Oak Stands an Uneven-Aged Regeneration Cut. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 478-482
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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