A Characterization of the Nonindustrial Private Forest Landowners of Arkansas

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  • Authors: Walkingstick, Tamara; Voth, Donald E.; Williams, Richard A.; Earl, Jeffery; Hitt, Carl P.
  • Publication Year: 2001
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS 41. Asheville, NC: U.S.Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 85-109

Abstract

Forest and timber and forest and timberland management are issues of great importance to Arkansas. The timber industry plays a major role in the State's economy and is constantly being transformed as it becomes more capital intensive and as the southern region, including Arkansas, becomes a more important player in the provision of the nation's supply of timber and timber-related products. This transformation is also affected by the globalization of this industry. Nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) landowners, who own and control a large proportion of Arkansas' forested lands, play an increasingly important role in providing these products. At the same time, aesthetic and environmental considerations have become more important. Much of Arkansas has benefited from the in-migration of retirees, as well as others who are attracted--among other things--by the State's "natural" environment, an environment that owes much to its vast forest lands, both public and private. The management of public forest lands is also being transformed, with increasing demands coming from practically all elements of the USDA National Forest's "multi-use" management strategy.

  • Citation: Walkingstick, Tamara; Voth, Donald E.; Williams, Richard A.; Earl, Jeffery; Hitt, Carl P. 2001. A Characterization of the Nonindustrial Private Forest Landowners of Arkansas. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS 41. Asheville, NC: U.S.Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 85-109
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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