Selection harvests in Amazonian rainforests: long-term impacts on soil properties

  • Authors: McNabb, K.L.; Miller, M.S.; Lockaby, B.G.; Stokes, B.J.; Clawson, R.G.; Stanturf, John A.; Silva, J.N.M.
  • Publication Year: 1997
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Forest Ecology and Management 93: 153-160.

Abstract

Surface soil properties were compared among disturbance classes associated with a single-tree selection harvest study installed in 1979 in the Brazilian Amazon. Response variables included pH, total N, total organic C, extractable P, exchangeable K, Ca, Mg, and bulk density. In general, concentrations of all elements displayed residual effects 16 years after harvests with N, P, K, and C being inversely related to disturbance intensity, while Ca and Mg levels as well as pH were directly related. Elemental contents exhibited fewer residual effects except in the cases of Ca and Mg contents, which generally increased with disturbance intensity. Higher intensity disturbance classes were associated with increased bulk density. Soil impacts apparent after i6 years suggest a combination of direct effects of harvests (e.g., as in the case of bulk density) combined with indirect influences of the ecophysiology of the Cecropia sp. which dominate disturbed areas.

  • Citation: McNabb, K.L.; Miller, M.S.; Lockaby, B.G.; Stokes, B.J.; Clawson, R.G.; Stanturf, John A.; Silva, J.N.M. 1997. Selection harvests in Amazonian rainforests: long-term impacts on soil properties. Forest Ecology and Management 93: 153-160.
  • Posted Date: January 1, 2000
  • Modified Date: April 20, 2007
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.