First county records of red crossbill in the pineywoods region of eastern Texas

  • Authors: Schaefer, Richard R.
  • Publication Year: 1998
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Bulletin of Texas Ornithological Society. 31(2): 63-64.

Abstract

The red crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) is reported from western Texas as a scarce and sporadic breeder in the Guadalupe Mountains, and a probable rare or irregular nester in the Davis Mountains. It is also a rare and irregular winter visitor in many parts of the State. Red crossbills invaded much of Texas during the 1972-1973 winter. This invasion missed the pineywoods region east of the Trinity River, with the exception of a single sight record in Polk County. Several northern, seed-eating bird species, including the red crossbill, are well known for their irregular, irruptive movements. These movements are believed to coincide with times of food shortages in the species’ normal range.

  • Citation: Schaefer, Richard R. 1998. First county records of red crossbill in the pineywoods region of eastern Texas. Bulletin of Texas Ornithological Society. 31(2): 63-64.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.