Policies for encouraging forest restoration

  • Authors: Mercer, D. Evan
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Pages 97-109 In Stanturf, J.A. and Madsen, P. (eds.). Restoration of Boreal and Temperate Forests. CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL.

Abstract

Throughout the 20th century, many countries created national parks, forests, nature reserves, and sanctuaries to provide benefits that are underproduced on private lands. Private lands are now especially valuable for providing ecological services that public lands cannot provide, due to the increasing demands for all uses and the political and economic conflicts associated with allocating public lands between competing uses (e.g., recreation, watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, wildlife habitat, commodity production) (Kline et al. 2000). In many countries, the supply of public lands may not be adequate to ensure desirable flows of beneficial ecosystem services . Furthermore, because many ecological processes cross ownership borders, enhancing the flow of benefits requires management at a broader, landscape scale and with the participation of both public and private landowners (Kline et al. 2000; Gottfried et al. 1996; Boyd and Wainger 2002a; Johnston et al. 2002).

  • Citation: Mercer, D. Evan. 2004. Policies for encouraging forest restoration. Pages 97-109 In Stanturf, J.A. and Madsen, P. (eds.). Restoration of Boreal and Temperate Forests. CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL.
  • Posted Date: January 1, 2000
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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