Defining old growth in the Southeast: example of cypress

  • Authors: Devall, Margaret S.; van Deusen, Paul C.; Reams, Gregory A.
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: n: Miller, Gary L., ed. The value of old growth forest ecosystems of the Eastern United States: conference proceedings; 1993 August 26-28; Asheville, NC. Asheville, NC: University of North Carolina, Asheville: 81-86.

Abstract

There is a lot of misunderstanding over what comprises an old growth stand, because there is no well accepted definition of old growth. Malcolm Hunter proposed a broad conceptual definition: "old-growth forests are relatively old and relatively undisturbed by humans." Because there can be large differences among forest types, Hunter suggested that specific definitions for each forest type could be derived from the broad definition and that age and disturbance criteria that may be ecologically significant could be modified to form locally appropriate definitions. This is the approach that the USDA Forest Service has taken. In this paper the authors review the process of defining old growth in the Southeast, the format for the definitions of old growth forest type groups, and the progress that has been made, and they discuss an example of one forest type group: the cypress-tupelo type.

  • Citation: Devall, Margaret S.; van Deusen, Paul C.; Reams, Gregory A. 1999. Defining old growth in the Southeast: example of cypress. n: Miller, Gary L., ed. The value of old growth forest ecosystems of the Eastern United States: conference proceedings; 1993 August 26-28; Asheville, NC. Asheville, NC: University of North Carolina, Asheville: 81-86.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Requesting Print Publications

    Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

    Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.