Longleaf pine seedling production

  • Authors: Barnett, James P.
  • Publication Year: 2000
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Longleaf Alliance Report No. 5: 46-48

Abstract

Longleaf pine is a highly desirable species, resisting fire, insects and pathogens, and produces quality solid-wood products, but regeneration of the species has been difficult. Natural regeneration is feasible only on a small portion of the area considered to be longleaf pine type. Therefore, artificial regeneration must become a reliable means of regenerating the species if restoration of the ecosystem is to be successful. The knowledge and technology to reestablish longleaf pine by planting bareroot stock has improved significantly within the last decade. However, numerous studies show that container seedlings survive and grow better than bareroot stock. Additional studies are underway to refine these techniques and provide a better understanding of the unique physiological attributes of longleaf seedlings that may allow us to improve regeneration success by planting.

  • Citation: Barnett, James P. 2000. Longleaf pine seedling production. Longleaf Alliance Report No. 5: 46-48
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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